The Afghan Adjustment Act

Following the U.S. military’s withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2021, more than 76,000 Afghans have entered the U.S. under a special process called “humanitarian parole.” Under humanitarian parole, Afghan evacuees can remain in the U.S. for just two years. When this parolee status expires, they will lose access to employment, health care, and their legal right […]

Welcoming Families at our Annual Picnic

Refugee families and Madison community members gathered in Olin Park on a sunny June afternoon for Open Doors for Refugees’ annual picnic. The celebration on June 26 was the first since 2019 — the event was paused for the past two summers due to the pandemic. Dozens of attendees enjoyed a potluck in the Olin […]

Title 42 is Still in Effect

Since it was enacted in March 2020, Title 42 has been used to turn away more than 1.7 million migrants at the Mexico-US border. Doctors Without Borders in Mexico report that Title 42 leaves migrants stranded in highly insecure conditions. “It is a xenophobic policy disguised as public health protection that does nothing but put […]

New Opportunity! – Get Support for Skill Building

Build Your Future: Skill Building Funding Opportunity Madison-area refugees are able to apply for funds and support for education and career development as part of our Skill Development Initiative. Those interested in furthering their English language proficiency, pursuing higher education, developing vocational skills, or starting or growing a business are eligible to apply in 2022 for […]

Community Picnic 2022

You’re invited! Sunday, June 26, 202212 p.m. to 4 p.m.(Potluck starts at 1 p.m.) Olin Park Pavilion1156 Olin-Turville Ct, Madison, WI Join us for our annual picnic for food, fun, and good company. Help us celebrate the refugee families we support and the amazing Madison community that welcomes them! Food: Potluck – please bring a […]

Meet Aziz

Aziz and his family arrived in Madison from Afghanistan in 2015. In 2021, thanks to his proficiency in English, Dari, and Pashto, he was chosen to work as an interpreter at Fort McCoy’s receiving center for Afghans who were fleeing due to the U.S. military’s sudden departure. Aziz was central to the movement of 12,600 […]